X Plane Boeing FMS Oceanic LAT/LONs rejected, "Not in Database."

X Plane 11 VMAX B777 and B787 both rejected LAT/LON inputs as Not in Database. Not a problem prior to 1120 database update.

Hi…

Welcome to our new forum.

Please post screenshots showing LAT/LON inputs and error using Posting Guide - Uploading Screenshots preferably for AIRAC 2011 and 2012

Cheers
Ian

Hello Ian,

Thanks for the quick response. I’m sending screenshots of two different methods of entering LAT/LONs using X Plane 11 Flight Factor B777. I encountered the same error with the VMAX B787.

Thanks again for your assistance in resolving this matter.

Carl

Carl,
two questions:

  1. What XP11 version do you use?
  2. What navdata version do the VMAX expect?

When you don’t know it exactly please ask the developer. Thank you. The answers are important to help you.

Richard

I assume you were trying to enter " named Oceanic Fixes " : LILNO -> SOMAX -> N4920 ?
there is a difference between entering a ‘named FIX’ and entering a Lat/Lon as a Fix, the ‘named FIX’ must be listed in the database the aircraft is using, where as a Lat/Lon can be any valid position on the Earth eg. Lat = 90 deg South to 90 deg North, and Lon = 180 deg W to 180 deg E.

Check out the 777 Operations Manual.pdf in your DOC’s folder, section 11.31.16 (766) on Manually Entered Latitude/ Longitude Waypoints.

Pilot defined waypoints entered as a latitude and longitude display in a seven–character format. Latitude and longitude waypoints are entered with no space or slash between the latitude and longitude entries. Leading zeroes must be entered. All digits and decimal points (to 1/10 minute) must be entered unless the latitude or longitude are full degrees. Examples:
• N47° W008° is entered as N47W008 and displays as N47W008
• N47° 15.4’ W008° 3.4’ is entered as N4715.4W00803.4 and displays as N47W008

If you read the section on LNAV it also expains; short code, long code, PBD ect.ect.

WAYPOINT IDENTIFIERS, Reporting Positions Defined by Coordinates.
Entry/Exit positions to Oceanic Control Areas are often defined by waypoints which are “undesignated”, made available in source documentation as geographical coordinates (Latitude/ Longitude) expressed in full degrees. In cases where such positions are to be entered into the data base, the follow- ing rules are applied: a. Positions in the northern hemisphere use the letters “N” and “E”, the southern hemisphere use the letters “S” and “W” and numerics for latitude and longitude as follows:

  1. Latitude, use values provided by source. Latitude will always precede longitude.
  2. Longitude, use only the last two values of the three digit longitude value.
  3. Placement of the letter designator in the five character set indicates what the first digit is published as. The letter designator will be the last character if the longitude is less than 100 degrees and will be the third character if the longitude is 100 degrees or greater.
  4. The letter “N” is used for north latitude and west longitude. The letter “E” is used for north latitude and east longitude. The letter “S” is used for south latitude and east longitude. The letter “W” is used for south latitude and west longitude.

Examples:
N latitude/W longitude

  • N52 00/W075 00 = 5275N
  • N50 00/W040 00 = 5040N
  • N07 00/W008 00 = 0708N
  • N75 00/W170 00 = 75N70
  • N07 00/W120 00 = 07N20

N latitude/E longitude

  • N50 00/E020 00 = 5020E
  • N75 00/E050 00 = 7550E
  • N06 00/E008 00 = 0608E
  • N75 00/E150 00 = 75E50
  • N06 00/E110 00 = 06E10

Also check out this old post on X-Plane.org.
If you still have problems after reading all that, give us a specific example of what your trying to enter with [screenshots] .

stephen.

1 Like

Stephen,

Thanks to you, Ian and Richard I should be able to input a flight plan with Named Fixes and LAT/LON Fixes. I will reread the material again and practice inputting LAT/LON fixes until my 79 year old brain can remember how its done.

Thanks again for quick and patience assistance provided by all of you at Navigraph.

Carl

Hi Carl,

You are welcome.

Thanks also to Stephen @cessna729 for comprehensive advice.

Cheers
Ian

This topic was automatically closed 7 days after the last reply. New replies are no longer allowed.